Phone: 206.239.4780
 

Japanese Language Classes

 

Engakuji Temple in Kamakura, Japan. Photo courtesy of Hideki Aikoh, English Faculty

Engakuji Temple in Kamakura, Japan. Photo courtesy of Hideki Aikoh, English and Japanese Instructor

The approach of the Washington Academy of Languages program is to  emphasize the use of authentic Japanese as it is naturally spoken and written.  Speaking and listening are practiced at normal speeds in the classroom. As a  result, students are able to communicate easily with native speakers. Research  in the area of second language acquisition suggests that the most effective  process for acquiring a language begins with listening followed by speaking,  reading and, finally, writing. At Washington Academy of Languages we follow  this process.

Japanese texts are used for learning reading and writing. Hiragana  is introduced in level 1. Students are encouraged to read and write in hiragana  from the start. Katakana, for foreign loan words, is taught in level 2. Finally,  Kanji is introduced towards the end of level 2 as part of this unified system  so that students are able to understand the various readings and pronunciation  of each character in different contexts.

Japanese is a non-European language and is quite different from  English; therefore, the time needed to master the language is longer than that  for European languages. At Washington Academy of Languages, stress is placed on  the quality rather than the quantity of language skills. Because of the small  class size, however, students have ample opportunities to speak and ask  questions in the class and are thus able to proceed quickly toward acquisition  of the language.

Levels

Japanese 1

By the end of this intensive session, the student will be able to  function minimally in Japanese. Students are immersed in Japanese, except for  limited explanations about culture and grammar in English. During class,  students engage in role plays and practice the language in situations which  focus on the students themselves and items around them. Topics include making  introductions, expressing simple greetings, asking for personal  information.  Another topic is going  shopping, in which students will learn how to identify objects and their prices.  The main grammar point to be taught in this  level is how to conjugate the verb Be in present tense.  In reading and writing, Hiragana is taught to  reinforce phonetic usage.

Required Textbook (Level 1-6):

Banno, E. (2011). Genki 1: An integrated course in elementary Japanese: Textbook (2. ed.). Tokyo: The Japan Times (ISBN: 9784789014403)

Banno, E. (2011). Genki 1: An integrated course in elementary Japanese: Workbook (2. ed.). Tokyo: The Japan Times. (ISBN:9784789014410)

Japanese 2

Prerequisite: Completion of Japanese 1, instructor’s permission or placement.

This course begins with a review of all the materials covered in  Japanese 1. This would be a good place to begin for the person who has been  away from the study of the language for any length of time, but has minimal grammar  and vocabulary. The main focus of this course is to learn conjugations of verbs  in the present tense as well as to identify the types of the verbs. Plain  present forms of verbs (dictionary forms), which are integral to learning  Japanese, are introduced for the first time.  Another grammar point is to explain where  things are. Practice situations include discussing daily routines and  activities with various words for time expressions, and identifying objects and  their locations. The use of English is limited. In reading and writing, Katakana  is taught for words with foreign origins as well as basic Kanji for time  expressions.

Required Textbook(Level 1-6):

Banno, E. (2011). Genki 1: An integrated course in elementary Japanese: Textbook (2. ed.). Tokyo: The Japan Times (ISBN: 9784789014403)

Banno, E. (2011). Genki 1: An integrated course in elementary Japanese: Workbook (2. ed.). Tokyo: The Japan Times. (ISBN:9784789014410)

Japanese 3

Prerequisite: Completion of Japanese 2, instructor’s permission or placement.

The focus of Japanese 3 is to build on the foundation which has  been established in the first two levels. In this level, the Te-forms of the  verbs are introduced to combine two verbs to show chronological order and to  express requests and permission.   Adjectives are also introduced in this level.   Practice situations include discussing and  describing a trip, and asking for and giving permission in daily life, as well  as giving and receiving street directions.   In reading and writing, approximately 30 new Kanji characters are introduced.

Required Textbook(Level 1-6):

Banno, E. (2011). Genki 1: An integrated course in elementary Japanese: Textbook (2. ed.). Tokyo: The Japan Times (ISBN: 9784789014403)

Banno, E. (2011). Genki 1: An integrated course in elementary Japanese: Workbook (2. ed.). Tokyo: The Japan Times. (ISBN:9784789014410)

Japanese 4

 Prerequisite: Completion of Japanese 3, instructor’s permission or placement.

This course presents extensive vocabulary, as well as specific  grammatical forms and usage. The vocabulary covers words related to family, and  how to describe people.  Situations  include describing actions in both in progress and resultant state.  Also students will learn how to express their  ideas, and talk about likes and dislikes.   Informal speech patterns with plain forms of verbs in both affirmative  and negative are also introduced. In reading and writing, approximately 30  kanji characters are introduced.

Required Textbook(Level 1-6):

Banno, E. (2011). Genki 1: An integrated course in elementary Japanese: Textbook (2. ed.). Tokyo: The Japan Times (ISBN: 9784789014403)

Banno, E. (2011). Genki 1: An integrated course in elementary Japanese: Workbook (2. ed.). Tokyo: The Japan Times. (ISBN:9784789014410)

Japanese 5

Prerequisite: Completion of Japanese 4, instructor’s permission or placement.

Japanese 5 is an expansion of the material covered in the previous  four levels.  New grammar includes talking  about actions in the past informally as well as future plans, and modifying  things and people with verb in plain forms.   It also includes comparatives and superlatives, and how to stare a  reason for your action. Practice situations involve making travel plans,  inviting friends to an event.  Approximately  30 Kanji characters are introduced in each chapter for reading and writing.

Required Textbook(Level 1-6):

Banno, E. (2011). Genki 1: An integrated course in elementary Japanese: Textbook (2. ed.). Tokyo: The Japan Times (ISBN: 9784789014403)

Banno, E. (2011). Genki 1: An integrated course in elementary Japanese: Workbook (2. ed.). Tokyo: The Japan Times. (ISBN:9784789014410)

Japanese 6

Prerequisite: Completion of Japanese 5, instructor’s permission or placement.

This course continues with the grammar and subject matter  introduced in Japanese 5. Expressing desires, talking about your experiences,  making a list of activities and objects, describing health, expressing  suggestions and obligations are the main grammar points covered in this  level.  Practice situations include  discussing a vacation and explaining illnesses.   Approximately 30 Kanji characters are introduced during the session. By  the end of Japanese 6, students should be able to move beyond a basic  functional level when applying all four skill areas in the language.

Required Textbook(Level 1-6):

Banno, E. (2011). Genki 1: An integrated course in elementary Japanese: Textbook (2. ed.). Tokyo: The Japan Times (ISBN: 9784789014403)

Banno, E. (2011). Genki 1: An integrated course in elementary Japanese: Workbook (2. ed.). Tokyo: The Japan Times. (ISBN:9784789014410)

Japanese 7

Prerequisite: Completion  of Japanese 6, instructor’s permission or placement.

In Japanese 7 students  should be able to use the language with ease and with increasing complexity.  Practice situations involve looking for jobs, talking about employment, and giving  and receiving gifts.  Grammar covered in  this course encompasses talking about your ability, making inferences based on direct  observation, expressing conditions originated by others, expressing frequency,  trying something, expressing desire (noun), giving and receiving, giving  suggestions, and describing quantity using numbers with positive/negative  particle.  Approximately 30 Kanji  characters are introduced in this level.

Japanese 8

Prerequisite: Completion  of Japanese 7, instructor’s permission or placement.

This course expands the grammar introduced in  the previous levels. Topics covered in this course are making trip plans and discussing  lost and found items. Grammar includes expressing intention with volitional  forms of verbs, talking about preparation, and modifying a noun with a sentence.  Also giving and receiving actions, requesting  politely, expressing wishes, forming a time clause, and apologizing are covered  in this level.  Approximately 30 Kanji  characters are introduced.

Japanese 9

Prerequisite: Completion  of Japanese 8, instructor’s permission or placement.

This course further expands the grammar  introduced in the previous levels. Topics covered in this course are speaking  about others with hearsay and indirect speech, and daily conversation at a work  place. Grammar includes expressing hearsay, quoting others, expressing  conditions and sequence of actions, expressing lack of necessity, expressing  conjecture based on direct evidence, and expressing chronological order of  multiple actions with a time clause. It also introduces transitive and  intransitive verb pairs, expressing completion and regrets, expressing  conditions leading to set consequences, expressing simultaneous actions.  Approximately 30 Kanji characters are  introduced.

Japanese 10

Prerequisite: Completion  of Japanese 9, instructor’s permission or placement.

This course will give  students a chance to be more culturally sensitive with more polite, honorific  and humble expressions. The focus is on fluidity of conversation with more  expressions that are based on the grammar the students are already familiar  with.  Topics covered in this course are  speaking to someone socially superior, going shopping from finding a place to  shop to returning purchased items.   Grammar covers polite forms, expressing presumptions, expressing ideas  without certain actions, imbedded questions, and expressing the fact that something  is easy or difficult to do.  Approximately  30 Kanji characters are introduced.

Japanese 11

Prerequisite: Completion  of Japanese 10, instructor’s permission or placement.

This course as well as the next one introduces  important grammar points to solidify the grammatical foundation so that  students feel even more comfortable and ready to tackle almost any  situation.  Topics covered in this course  are burglary and education. Grammar includes passive and causative, expressing  results of intentional actions, expressing desire for others to do perform  actions for you, expressing an intentional change with adjectives, expressing  an action while another is going on.  It  also includes soft command, expressing an open, hypothetical condition, expressing  situations contrary to expectations, and expressing similarities.  Approximately 30 Kanji characters are  introduced.

Japanese 12

Prerequisite: Completion  of Japanese 11, instructor’s permission or placement.

This course finishes the second year. Students  should be able to carry on satisfactory conversations for a prolong period of  time after the course.  Students will be  ready to move on to medium and/or high intermediate where they further study collocations,  idioms, and more advanced grammar.  It is  also a good opportunity for students to review everything they have studied  so far and realize and strengthen their weaknesses.  The topics covered in this course are departing  and talking about memories.  Grammar points  included in this chapter are causative-passive, making decisions, and  expressing how to do things.  Approximately  15 Kanji characters are introduced.

Intermediate Japanese Conversation

Prerequisite: Completion of Japanese 3, instructor’s permission  or placement.

This course is designed for students at the  intermediate to low advanced level. The focus is on increasing comprehension  and fluency in the language, vocabulary building and revision of grammar  points. Discussion on topics of interest helps students to express their ideas  correctly, clearly and effectively. Conversation topics will include routine  travel situations. The course is customized to fit the needs of class members.

Schedule

Classes must have a minimum of 4 students to run. Shared private lessons and custom programs are also available

-All classes are 20 hours.

*Classes falling on holidays will be rescheduled.

Spring Session B: May – June
Course Instructor Days Time Start date End date
Japanese 2 Kyoko Sano Mondays and Wednesdays 6:30 – 8:30 PM 5/15/2017 6/19/2017*

*Holiday: 5/29

If you have not taken Japanese 1, then you must request a placement.  Placement requests are due by Monday, May 1st for these classes.

Register here. Registrations are due by Sunday, May 7th.

Summer Session: July- August

Schedule will be posted mid-May. Enter your email here for schedule updates.

Custom Program

WAL can design a special language program for you or your group.  Custom classes are planned with your needs and objectives in mind. WAL has the materials and instructional staff to provide you with an outstanding experience! Choose the number of hours you want to study and the dates of your study and we will design a program just for you.

Custom Programs may be contracted in 10-hour blocks that must be used within 5 weeks. Request a Custom Program here.

Corporate Programs

Communication is always key, especially in the world of business. Our experienced instructors are ready to come to your office with a tailored, industry-specific approach to language instruction. Program content is customized to meet the needs of individual companies.

Instruction requires a minimum of 10 hours total and a minimum of 1.5 hours per lesson.  Programs are generally scheduled on weekdays. Meeting dates and times are flexible. Instruction can be delivered at corporate sites or at our downtown office.

Please contact us at 206-239-4789 or wal@cityu.edu for more information or to receive quote.

Tuition

Class Type Cost 
Evening & Day Classes $315 (effective 8/1/2016)
Custom Programs $600/10 hours
Shared Custom Programs $450/10 hours per person (2-3 students)
Specialized Programs $750/10 hours
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